swITch

Ghana has a population of approximately 23 million, with 58% living in rural areas and 42% in urban areas. Agriculture accounts for 50% of the GDP and employs 85% of the workforce. Cocoa is the most frequently cultivated crop and accounts for 70% of Ghana’s export earnings. Although Ghana’s economy is improving, the nation remains one of the poorest nations in the world,

“ranking 130 out of 177 countries”

on the 2010 United Nation’s Human Development Index, which considers indicators such as per capita income, life expectancy, and adult literacy.
The Government of Ghana has placed a strong emphasis on the role of ICT in contributing to the country’s economy. The country’s medium-term development plan captured in the Ghana Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (GPRS I&II) and the Education Strategic Plan 2003-2015 all suggest the use of ICT as a means of reaching out to the poor in Ghana.

Problem Statement.

There is now growing evidence of the role that ICT can play in enhancing development. In recognition of this, the UN Millennium Declaration outlines a focus on partnerships with the private sector to “ensure that the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communication technologies … are available to all.”
In spite of this enabling potential and role, ICT is yet to be widely mainstreamed to assist developing countries in addressing traditional development problems with innovative solutions and approaches that are both effective and more easily scalable and replicable

The application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in schools is
perceived as a means for transforming teaching and learning processes, and has thus
been met with significant enthusiasm. The de veloping world also perceives ICT as a tool
that will promote socioeconomic, political, and sustainable development. This
perception underpins the introduction of computers and the internet in some High
schools in Ghana.

The editorial quoted from 2007 World Bank report on the Internet use in the world, which said that,

“only 401,300 Ghanaians, representing 1.8 percent of the country’s population of an estimated 22 million, have access to the Internet.”

Many students in Ghana do not have any access to computers up to the average age of 18 years for those who join University and even later for those who do not join University. We should seek to encourage students to learn and appreciate Information Technology by providing them with the necessary computer skills and also equipping their teachers to educate and effectively integrate computers into the teaching program. Appropriate logical approaches need to be identified in order to maximize the use of computers in our schools.

Find here available TNs

TN-In-GH-CU-2012-494 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 12.4.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-495 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 12.4.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-496 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 12.4.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-497 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 12.4.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-486 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 16.2.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-487 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 16.2.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-488 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 16.2.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-489 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 16.2.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-490 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 16.2.2012 Available
TN-In-GH-CU-2012-491 YES project AIESEC CUC GHANA 16.2.2012 Available



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